Graffiti & the Story of the Aerosol – “The Krylon”

Posted on July 31, 2013

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another article by Mickey Boston for the heads to enjoy…

“We LOST Fat Beats, will we be losing 5Pointz Now?” – Mic-Key Boston Kovaks

 

As 5Pointz was to become a Mecca for Graffiti by means of attracting legendary writers from the likes of Stay High 149, SPE, Tracy 168, COPE2 and Tats Cru, it was also to become a location menaced by the interests of corporate real-estate and big-money capitalism. In essence, 5Pointz was to signify a meeting point of various styles converging from five boroughs into One Voltron. Little was anyone to know that the location was to bring artists from around the world to come together.

Mickey Boston and Regimental Oneton come together to bring “The Krylon” directed by Nestor Narvaez and Alberic Filhol. Produced by XEptional, “The Krylon” features the turntablism of DJ Overflow with cameos by Meres One and COPE2. The video itself features the art of Regimental Oneton and pays specific homage to 5Pointz where part of the video was shot.

As the track is featured on Mickey Boston and Regimental Oneton’s debut album Enter the 36 Tentacles, “The Krylon” is poised on highlighting ideals of the graffiti culture in its lyrical narrative in which the two emcees rhyme about nostalgic and contemporary notions of their experiences and memories of the art form.

From tagging came a more sophisticated artistic medium via the spraycan’s omnipotent presence gripped within the artist’s palm. What was once a moment of “vandalism” became a meticulous craft that was no longer “hit and run.” Jumping a fence or looking over one’s shoulder was still present however, aesthetic desire to create something more than just a tag on a wall was deemed necessary for the artist for he/she was preoccupied with making and producing an oeuvre that would have time, meditation and color invested in it.

Indeed, the ideal of tagging on trains at night in vacant yards prompted trespassing however also sparked a frenzy that was to become global. The art was present before hip-hop even had a needle project it’s rhythms out a speaker as funk and boogaloo were beginning to emerge within the score of the artist’s soundtrack. Undoubtedly, the writer was to become the master creator and source of the artistic phenomena that was instantaneously dubbed as vandalism.

Recorded in 2012 while filmed and released in 2013, “The Krylon” delves back; back on masterpiece artwork done over the years from an era in which hip-hop itself has been subject to extreme rhythmic and lyrical change. The track was not only a tribute to a Mecca that was and still is an attraction to gifted writers and emcees, but also a tribute to those who simply loved the hip-hop that was coming out back in the 90s. A track written and recorded as well as produced in 2012 was the ambition of the project, yet in attempt to have that ’91-97 sound was the goal that was desired to be achieved. To compliment the sound was the album cover-art that was also destined to have a 90s feel to it, DJ Overflow’s scratches and cuts were also customized to find a proper juxtaposition to the grainy sound that was used in the track’s arrangement.

With poignant cover-art that is personally handcrafted by the aerosol can handling of Oneton himself, the pair of unlikely emcees who came together on new productions is crafted as a hiphop that eventually harkens back to the very rap that hiphop fiends from the late 90s initially fell in love with. With their multisyllabic rhymes, relatable topics and grimy soundbeds of mutant, insect, pornographic and tentacle allusions, the emcees bring together the very hiphop that is able to cover ground on very serious themes of the likes of politics, inequality, poverty, drug-addiction and quotidian struggle. As a veteran emcee-activist, Mickey Boston has yet to release his solo album despite having marked a notable presence on all six tracks of his hiphop group’s, Journeymen, debut EP entitled Pledge of the Respirator which was entirely produced by Journeymen emcee/producer, John Wholetrain.

When art imitates life and life imitates art: Mickey Boston and Regimental Oneton, although being opposites, paint a musical canvas with lyrics that reveal the brunt realities of life with it's ups and downs and everything in between. Just get the Enter the 36 Tentacles album.

When art imitates life and life imitates art: Mickey Boston and Regimental Oneton, although being opposites, paint a musical canvas with lyrics that reveal the brunt realities of life with it’s ups and downs and everything in between. Just get the Enter the 36 Tentacles album.

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